Jessica Fairchild

I’d like to refer a fellow WordPress blogger, Jessica Fairchild, a talented photojournalist whose blog features samples of her work and stories about her adventures, primarily in Uganda, where she works for a non-profit organization.

Here’s a photo of her, followed by her self-description:

Jessica Fairchild

Jessica Fairchild

I am a photojournalist, and I love every second of it.
I currently work for a non-profit organization called Invisible Children who are focused on education in Northern Uganda, and I am currently living in Northern Uganda, photographing and doccumenting the progress they are making, and how the money raised in America is being used on the ground there.
Besides IC, I am majoring in Visual Communication, while persuing my own photo business of weddings, concerts, and creative portraits on the side.
I have little desire to be a fashion photographer, or work for an ad firm , because I find it ridiculous to sell something to people who already have everything they “need.”
Images are powerful, and can move and inspire, and therefore I want my images to capture the emotion, pain, hurt, broken hearts (both around the world, and in my own neighborhood), and bring them back here to america to open peoples eyes to see not only the tragedy, but to see the joy as well and truly learn the story of of each culture I experience-and be inspired to do something, and act.
At age 20 I have already discovered what I want to do for the rest of my life, and I am doing it.

Her blog includes a couple posts about Antigua (one, two) that feature some striking photos. From her post “Camera Shy”:

Camera Shy

Camera Shy

This blew my mind.
The people here are camera shy…
Having traveled to other developing countries I have found so many (especially children) who crave to have their picture taken, but here it is a different story.
During Guatemala’s 36 year civil war, the government would take photos of people on the street in order to show their army the targets. Because of this, when you go to take a photo of someone they will immediately cover thier face because they are afraid of being identified.
When you walk past them they will smile and say hello, but the second they see you with your camera they hide their face. What amazes me is how the war has been over for many years now, yet the survivors of the war have instilled this fear into their children of having their picture taken. Yet in this photograph, the littlest girl had no fear, I couldn’t figure out why.

Ms. Fairchild also posts her photos on Flickr. In particular, I enjoyed her Central American collections (Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica).

Some of my favorites from these collection:

Costa Rica

Costa Rica

Costa Rica

Costa Rica

Nicaragua

Nicaragua

Nicaragua

Nicaragua

Guatemala

Guatemala

Guatemala

Guatemala

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s